Robert Howard Byrd (August 15, 1934 – September 12, 2007), better known as Bobby Byrd, was an American R&B/soul singer, songwriter, bandleader, talent scout, record producer, and musician, who played an integral and important part in the development of soul and funk music in association with James Brown. Byrd began his career in 1952 as member of the gospel group the Gospel Starlighters, who later changed their name to the Avons in 1953 and the Five Royals in 1954, before settling with the name the Flames in 1955 prior to Brown joining the group with their agent later changing it to The Famous Flames. Byrd was the actual founder of The Flames, and is the man credited with the discovery of James Brown. As one of the longest-serving members of the group, he was inducted to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame posthumously in 2012. Byrd was also a 1998 recipient of the Rhythm and Blues Foundation's Pioneer Award. Throughout, Byrd helped to inspire the musical aspirations of James Brown, who launched his career with Byrd. 

 

 
  James Joseph Brown (May 3, 1933 – December 25, 2006) was an American singer, songwriter, musician, and recording artist. He is one of the founding fathers of funk music and is a major figure of 20th century popular music and dance. In a career that spanned six decades, Brown profoundly influenced the development of many different musical genres.[2] Brown moved on a continuum of blues and gospel-based forms and styles to a profoundly "Africanized" approach to music making. First coming to national public attention in the mid-1950s as a member of the R&B singing group The Famous Flames, Brown performed in concerts, first making his rounds across the chitlin' circuit, and then across the country and later around the world, along with appearing in shows on television and in movies. Although he contributed much to the music world through his hitmaking, Brown holds the record as the artist who charted the most singles on the Billboard Hot 100 without ever hitting number one on that chart.  
 
Gwen McCrae (born Gwen Mosley, December 21, 1943, Pensacola, Florida, United States[1]) is an American R&B singer, best known for her 1975 hit "Rockin' Chair".  
Hollie Farris is the Trumpet player for The Joss Stone Band, playing along side the other half of the horn section Mr Jeffery Watkins on saxaphone. Hollie has worked with Steve Winwood, The Commitments and James Brown as trumpet player, arranger, writer, band leader and Musical Director.  

The Man Who Hands James Brown His Cape, Danny Ray!

 

Clyde Stubblefield (born April 18, 1943 in Chattanooga, Tennessee) is a drummer best known for his work with James Brown.
Stubblefield's recordings with James Brown are considered to be some of the standard-bearers for funk drumming, including the singles "Cold Sweat", "There Was A Time", "I Got The Feelin'", "Say It Loud - I'm Black and I'm Proud", "Ain't It Funky Now", "Mother Popcorn", and the album Sex Machine.

 

Martha High (born Martha Harvin, Washington, D.C.) is an American female vocalist.
Harvin grew up in Washington, D.C., attending Roosevelt High School and singing in Trinity AME Zion Church. She began singing in The Four Jewels (whose members attended the same church and school) after the departure of Carrie Mingo. After Martha joined the group, they changed their name simply to The Jewels and released their best-known hit, "Opportunity". After a follow-up single, "But I Do" b/w "Smokey Joe", flopped, they were dropped from Dimension Records.

 

Marva Whitney (born Marva Ann Manning, May 1, 1944 – December 22, 2012), was an American funk singer.[1] Whitney was considered by many funk enthusiasts to be one of the "rawest" and "brassiest" music divas.

 

Jocelyn Eve Stoker[1] (born 11 April 1987), better known by her stage name Joss Stone, is a British soul singer, songwriter and actress. Stone rose to fame in late 2003 with her multi-platinum debut album, The Soul Sessions, which made the 2004 Mercury Prize shortlist. Her second album, the similarly multi-platinum Mind Body & Soul, topped the UK Albums Chart for one week and spawned the top ten hit "You Had Me", Stone's most successful single on the UK Singles Chart to date. Both the album and single received one nomination at the 2005 Grammy Awards, while Stone herself was nominated for Best New Artist, and in an annual BBC poll of music critics, Sound of 2004[2] was ranked fifth as a predicted breakthrough act of 2004. She became the youngest British female singer whose debut album topped the UK Albums Chart. Stone's third album, Introducing Joss Stone, released in March 2007, achieved gold record status by the RIAA and yielded the second-ever highest debut for a British female solo artist on the Billboard 200, and became Stone's first Top 5 album in the United States and first non-Top 10 album in the United Kingdom.

 

George McCrae (born October 19, 1944) is an American soul and disco singer, most famous for his 1974 hit "Rock Your Baby"

 

Joe Quarterman, aka Sir Joe Quarterman and sometimes misspelled as Joe Quatermain is an American funk and soul singer. Quarterman earned the title "Sir" in high school. His single, "(I Got) So Much Trouble in My Mind", was also his biggest, reaching the R&B Top 30 in 1973, and was featured on the radio station Master Sounds 98.3 in Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas. After leaving the music industry, Quarterman earned a degree in architecture. His song "I'm Gonna Get You" was later featured on the breakbeat compilation Ultimate Breaks and Beats.

 

Kurt Walker (born August 9, 1959), professionally known by his stage name Kurtis Blow, is an American rapper and record producer. He is the first commercially successful rapper and the first to sign with a major record label. "The Breaks", a single from his 1980 debut album, is the first certified gold record rap song.

 

 

 

 

quellen wikipedia,http://www.jossstoneuk.com/t9-hollie-farris-trumpet-player, http://www.berdanrecords.com/blogs/news/6009398-the-man-who-hands-james-brown-his-cape-danny-ray


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